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Where does your phone come from? The Economist

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The Economist, “Many of the elements used in smartphones are finite resources and have no functional substitutes. Rather than digging in the ground for the elements needed for new handsets it makes sense to extract them from old phones – but only about 10% of handsets are recycled now. So recycle your phone if you get a new one this year. Why? It is you might say, Elementary.”

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Rare Earths in Headphones

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Check out our posts on social media for an example of recycling rare earths below. The picture shows the magnets from an older pair of headphones compared with newer ones. The old ones are from over 10 years ago and have a ferrite magnet, which is big, bulky, and produces fairly bad sound. The new ones are much better. The red circle marks the NdFeB (Neodymium) magnet in the modern headphones, which weighs about 0.65 grams.

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“Tokyo aims to reduce China dependency to 50% or less” Nikkei

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“Japan will conduct the financing through a government-owned resource investment company: the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., or Jogmec. Legislation will be revised to allow it to take stakes in rare-earths smelting projects. Processing facilities, which have a large environmental impact, are now primarily concentrated in China. And Beijing has employed its dominance in rare earths to exert pressure before. In 2010, it quietly cut exports to Japan amid a dust-up over a territorial issue. Jogmec will also take steps to ensure Japan’s stable access to cobalt, a mineral used in lithium-ion batteries, to counter Chinese enterprises securing rights in Congo. The resource company could spend up to around 20 billion yen ($182 million) in all on both efforts.”

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InvestmentPitch Media reports on GeoMega Debt Financing

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Quebec-based GeoMegA Resources has developed a proprietary, environmentally-friendly ISR technology that recycles rare earth elements using magnet residue and recycled magnets as the main source of feed. The company intends to process feed from magnet manufacturers, alloy makers, and recyclers across Europe and the US at it’s Canadian facility. The company uses organic, solvent-free proprietary technology to isolate and purify four high demand, high priced rare earth elements, which represents an estimated 30% of annual global demand for rare earth elements and 80% of the total market value.

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Transcript: Kiril Mugerman with Proactive at VRIC2020

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Kiril Mugerman: We are recycling those magnets. When we receive them, what happens is that we crush them if we receive them as solids. Sometimes we receive them as powders already, which is crushed material. Then it goes into a reactor where a process happens. It’s a sequence of three reactors where basically a process goes from one to the next one to the next one and we get our final product. The closer it goes towards the end of the process, the more similar to a traditional process. The first stages are very different and innovative, and do not produce the same waste that are produced in traditional technologies today.

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“The sooner we produce oxides in North America, the faster we will attract companies capable of making alloys,” Kiril Mugerman

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However, Quebec and Canada are light years away from having an integrated industry, says Kiril Mugerman, president and chief executive officer of Ressources Géoméga, an SME from Boucherville that owns the Montviel rare earth deposit. , in the Nord-du-Québec region.

“The sooner we produce oxides in North America, the faster we will attract companies capable of making alloys,” he insists.

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CEO Quote 2020-01-14 NR

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“With the joint action plan on critical minerals collaboration that was signed between United States and Canada on January 9, 2020 we are starting to see the first concrete steps by both countries in securing supply chains for the critical minerals needed for important manufacturing sectors, including communication technology, aerospace and defence, and clean technology. We envision that our demonstration plant in St-Bruno can become the center of Quebec’s rare earths hub that would bring these critical materials back to North America. We are now finalizing the details of the financing package for the demonstration plant and information will be provided shortly.” commented Kiril Mugerman, President & CEO of Geomega.

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@GITI_SG Tweets on news from China

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#China: Ganzhou deputy mayor, deputy directors of Mining Bureau, of Natural Resources Bureau and of Soil & Water Conservation Bureau punishedhttps://finance.sina.com.cn/china/gncj/2020-01-09/doc-iihnzahk3037739.shtml …
Collusion, false reports, fake data, waste dumping in supposed environmental cleanup of closed #RareEarths mines.

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Canada and U.S. Finalize Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration

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Today, Canada and the U.S. announced they have finalized the Canada–U.S. Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration, advancing our mutual interest in securing supply chains for the critical minerals needed for important manufacturing sectors, including communication technology, aerospace and defence, and clean technology. This announcement delivers on the June 2019 commitment by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the United States.

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Why Asia weaponized rare earths, soybeans and palm oil in 2019

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Why Asia weaponized rare earths, soybeans and palm oil in 2019 Published DECEMBER 28, 2019. By RURIKA IMAHASHI and CK TAN, Nikkei staff writers. “Looking back on 2019,” said Yoshikazu Watanabe, president of Tsukushi Shigen Consul, a consultancy specializing in resources, “it was about weaponizing commodities.” Why Asia weaponized rare earths, soybeans and palm oil […]

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“CIRCULAR ECONOMY” KIRIL MUGERMAN, $GMA

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“People are starting to talk about it. We started talking about it five years ago! Today, we are slowly starting to see the US government, the Canadian government, and the European Union all waking up to the reality that you do need to go after the circular economy behind rare earth elements.” Kiril Mugerman, November […]

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NEODYMIUM USAGE IN DRONE MOTORS

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Learn about the ongoing “trend to use powerful neodymium magnets to generate high torque in a compact motor.” Originally published 2017/4/20 by by Takashi Kenjo, Nidec Technical Adviser. https://www.nidec.com/en/technology/motor/academic/009/ “When training a motor scientist or engineer, it is important to bring up the question “why?” One must be able to form a clear picture in […]

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WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

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As in Wikipedia, “Due to its role in permanent magnets used for wind turbines, it has been argued that neodymium will be one of the main objects of geopolitical competition in a world running on renewable energy. But this perspective has been criticised for failing to recognise that most wind turbines do not use permanent […]

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BIOHACKERS USING PERMANENT MAGNETS?

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Did you know people have studied, “magnets inserted into an individual’s fingers as a form of human computer interface”? Learn more, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01969722.2018.1448223 Biohackers with skin implants to feel magnetic fields? I.Harrison, K.Warwick and V.Ruiz (2018), “Subdermal Magnetic Implants: An Experimental Study”, Cybernetics and Systems. “In this paper, we consider the use of permanent implanted magnets […]

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WHY ARE NEODYMIUM MAGNETS STRONG?

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As in Wikipedia, Neodymium magnet A neodymium magnet (also known as NdFeB, NIB or Neo magnet) is the most widely used type of rare-earth magnet. It is a permanent magnet made from an alloy of neodymium, iron, and boron to form the Nd 2Fe 14B tetragonal crystalline structure. The strength of neodymium magnets is due […]

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PERMANENT MAGNET MOTORS?

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Read this description of “rare earth motor” that doesn’t use battery. It’s a bold claim with limited details because it is patent pending. Has anyone replicated the results described here? Could we improve on them with new methods or materials? https://www.powerelectronics.com/technologies/alternative-energy/article/21864052/new-discovery-could-lead-to-commercial-production-of-permanent-magnet-motors “Attract-Repel Demo: We constructed an apparatus to demonstrate the simultaneous resultant attraction in the […]

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RARE EARTHS IN CORDLESS TOOLS

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Did you know, “Permanent Magnets have replaced other types of magnets in many applications in modern products that require strong permanent magnets, such as motors in cordless tools, hard disk drives and magnetic fasteners”‎. Neodymium magnet Neodymium magnet A neodymium magnet (also known as NdFeB, NIB or Neo magnet) is the most widely used type […]